irresponsiblejam

Jamming irresponsibly since 2012.

1,878 notes

naamahdarling:

malefactum:

I’ve gotten a lot of asks wondering how I make the fangs shown above so here is my easy cheap trick:

• Buy plain fake nails from the store (ex: walgreens, cvs, beauty supply, it’s all cheap really and with a whole pack you can make as many as you want or reuse your old ones!)

• Use scissors to cut out fangs to fit your teeth. (Use a size up from your tooth so it will lie flat.)

Purchase denture glue (yes that stuff that old folks use to keep their fake teeth in with)

Apply a small amount to the back of the fake nail/tooth and hold it on to your tooth until it feels secure. (Your lips will help keep it in, don’t worry if it moves when you push it with your tongue.)

Voila! You’re the inhuman creature you have always wished to be. Just.. you know… don’t eat anything except liquids or your dreams will come crashing down.

Eternally Yours, 

   Malefactum

I used to do this in high school.  It really works, and it looks way better than you’d expect.

Scared the shit out of some kid at the mall with it.

Also, this person is inhumanly beautiful.  Goddamn.

Filed under costume reference

42,918 notes

thewomanfromitaly:

jragonsoul:

thewomanfromitaly:

i am 100% for women responding very rudely and aggressively to disgusting unsolicited messages or dick pics from men on the internet

^^^^^^^^ I support this message with everything I have, except my penis, of which you will not be getting unwanted AND/OR unsolicited pics about.

excuse me hello 911 i have an emergency

yes

yes hes finding a way to talk about his penis anyway

(via jadelyn)

118,940 notes

cosima-niehaus:

fulloffeels:

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

sixpenceee:

Before I get into it, just know the pictures just serve as visual representations, not actual pictures

Okay so anyway, evidence for this theory is the following:

THE FACT THAT HUMANS ARE SO HAIRLESS: 

Only two kind of habitats give rise to hairless animals, an aquatic one and a one below the ground (a naked mole rat for example)

.The suggestion that humans have become hairless to prevent overheating has been rendered false because hair can act like a defense against the sun.

This is why camels retain their fur even in the hot dessert environment. 

OUR FAT CELLS

We have ten times the number of fat cells as expected in an animal our size. Only two types of animals have large fat cells: hibernating and aquatic ones. 

In hibernating it’s seasonal fat, but in aquatic it’s all year round. It’s unreasonable to think that we evolved this feature in land because large fat pockets would have just slowed us down. 

Primate babies are always born slender, but human babies start to develop fat even before birth. 

WALKING ON TWO LEGS

So we’re the only mammals that have developed bipedalism. This is a surprise, because walking on 2 legs vs. walking on 4 legs is very disadvantageous. It’s slower, unstable, our organs are vulnerable to damage.

One theory is that if our habitat was flooded, we’d have to walk on two legs to keep our heads above the water.

The only animal who has ever evolved a pelvis like ours, the swamp ape, used this method. 

BREATHING

We have conscious control over our breathing. Ever other land animal doesn’t. Mammals like dolphins and seals also conscious control because it tells them how deep they are going to dive and they can estimate how much air they need to inhale.

OTHER DIFFERENCES

Our body is so wasteful of salt and water. Think of tears and our way of sweating. Other land mammals don’t have this. Water mammals do however. 

Okay anyway I hope you learned something. 

Here’s a source and where you can find more information: X

For more interesting posts like this, go here: X

So. Basically. We were FUCKING MERMAIDS. Damn.

I mainly want to believe this is correct so I can be descended from mermaids

Also! we’re pruny. we have a better grip on submerged objects when our fingertips are pruny. ah wow theories,

(Source: sixpenceee, via horrorproportions)

Filed under science?

103 notes

Anonymous asked: I'm sorry, but I'm confused on what qualifies as Disability Superpower. I remember reading a book by Diane Duane, the "Wizards" series, and I remember one of the characters the main duo comes across is an autistic kid. I'm fuzzy on the details, but no one (not among the other wizards) seems to notice that something is wrong with him as he's just being more closed off than usual, but wizards know that he's fighting the big bad inside his head? The wizard abilities give him freedom beyond autism?

thewritingcafe:

Giving a character with a disability a power is a bad thing when that power negates their disability, compensates for it, or cures it.

With mental illness and neuroatypical disorders and conditions, a lot of people write characters with these disorders as having superpowers that cause all the symptoms. This is mostly seen with autism in which the character is a magical genius who can see through time and space or something because non-disabled people feel the need to give otherworldly explanations for why some people are just different.

This post has more information.

You can give superpowers to people who are disabled or neuroatypical, but it shouldn’t be related to “fixing” them or “explaining” them.

Filed under disability writing

15,128 notes

Writing Traumatic Injuries References

alatar-and-pallando:

So, pretty frequently writers screw up when they write about injuries. People are clonked over the head, pass out for hours, and wake up with just a headache… Eragon breaks his wrist and it’s just fine within days… Wounds heal with nary a scar, ever…

I’m aiming to fix that.

Here are over 100 links covering just about every facet of traumatic injuries (physical, psychological, long-term), focusing mainly on burns, concussions, fractures, and lacerations. Now you can beat up your characters properly!

General resources

WebMD

Mayo Clinic first aid

Mayo Clinic diseases

First Aid

PubMed: The source for biomedical literature

Diagrams: Veins (towards heart), arteries (away from heart) bones, nervous system, brain

 

Burns

General overview: Includes degrees

Burn severity: Including how to estimate body area affected

Burn treatment: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd degrees

Smoke inhalation

Smoke inhalation treatment

Chemical burns

Hot tar burns

Sunburns

 

Incisions and Lacerations

Essentials of skin laceration repair (including stitching techniques)

When to stitch (Journal article—Doctors apparently usually go by experience on this)

More about when to stitch (Simple guide for moms)

Basic wound treatment

Incision vs. laceration: Most of the time (including in medical literature) they’re used synonymously, but eh.

Types of lacerations: Page has links to some particularly graphic images—beware!

How to stop bleeding: 1, 2, 3

Puncture wounds: Including a bit about what sort of wounds are most likely to become infected

More about puncture wounds

Wound assessment: A huge amount of information, including what the color of the flesh indicates, different kinds of things that ooze from a wound, and so much more.

Home treatment of gunshot wound, also basics
More about gunshot wounds, including medical procedures

Tourniquet use: Controversy around it, latest research

Location pain chart: Originally intended for tattoo pain, but pretty accurate for cuts

General note: Deeper=more serious. Elevate wounded limb so that gravity draws blood towards heart. Scalp wounds also bleed a lot but tend to be superficial. If it’s dirty, risk infection. If it hits the digestive system and you don’t die immediately, infection’ll probably kill you. Don’t forget the possibility of tetanus! If a wound is positioned such that movement would cause the wound to gape open (i.e. horizontally across the knee) it’s harder to keep it closed and may take longer for it to heal.

 

Broken bones

Types of fractures

Setting a broken bone when no doctor is available

Healing time of common fractures

Broken wrists

Broken ankles/feet

Fractured vertebrae: Neck (1, 2), back

Types of casts

Splints

Fracture complications

Broken noses

Broken digits: Fingers and toes

General notes: If it’s a compound fracture (bone poking through) good luck fixing it on your own. If the bone is in multiple pieces, surgery is necessary to fix it—probably can’t reduce (“set”) it from the outside. Older people heal more slowly. It’s possible for bones to “heal” crooked and cause long-term problems and joint pain. Consider damage to nearby nerves, muscle, and blood vessels.

 

Concussions

General overview

Types of concussions 1, 2

Concussion complications

Mild Brain Injuries: The next step up from most severe type of concussion, Grade 3

Post-concussion syndrome

Second impact syndrome: When a second blow delivered before recovering from the initial concussion has catastrophic effects. Apparently rare.

Recovering from a concussion

Symptoms: Scroll about halfway down the page for the most severe symptoms

Whiplash

General notes: If you pass out, even for a few seconds, it’s serious. If you have multiple concussions over a lifetime, they will be progressively more serious. Symptoms can linger for a long time.




Character reaction:

Shock (general)

Physical shock: 1, 2

Fight-or-flight response: 1, 2

Long-term emotional trauma: 1 (Includes symptoms), 2

First aid for emotional trauma

 

Treatment (drugs)

WebMD painkiller guide

 

Treatment (herbs)

1, 2, 3, 4

 

Miscellany

Snake bites: No, you don’t suck the venom out or apply tourniquettes

Frostbite

Frostbite treatment

Severe frostbite treatment

When frostbite sets in: A handy chart for how long your characters have outside at various temperatures and wind speeds before they get frostbitten

First aid myths: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Includes the ones about buttering burns and putting snow on frostbite.

Poisons: Why inducing vomiting is a bad idea

Poisonous plants

Dislocations: Symptoms 1, 2; treatment. General notes: Repeated dislocations of same joint may lead to permanent tissue damage and may cause or be symptomatic of weakened ligaments. Docs recommend against trying to reduce (put back) dislocated joint on your own, though information about how to do it is easily found online.

Muscular strains

Joint sprain

Resuscitation after near-drowning: 1, 2

Current CPR practices: We don’t do mouth-to-mouth anymore.

The DSM IV, for all your mental illness needs.

 

Electrical shock

Human response to electrical shock: Includes handy-dandy voltage chart

Length of contact needed at different voltages to cause injury

Evaluation protocol for electric shock injury

Neurological complications

Electrical and lightning injury

Cardiac complications

Delayed effects and a good general summary

Acquired savant syndrome: Brain injuries (including a lightning strike) triggering development of amazing artistic and other abilities

 

Please don’t repost! You can find the original document (also created by me) here.

(via nobodysuspectsthebutterfly)

Filed under writing reference